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Bernard Malamud is an American writer whose father was a Russian Jew. Malamud achieved literary fame in America. His novel ‘The Assistant’ is a book that addresses the problems of America as seen through the eyes of Malamud. The writer in this book examines the American dream, as it appears to an outsider. The American dream of prosperity and what it holds for an emigrant is addressed by Malamud.
Published by Madan G Singh 50 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
The Richard Burton Diaries reveal Burton as a very intelligent man. Readers will be particularly interested in his account of his relationship with Elizabeth Taylor. The diaries make interesting reading. Perhaps at times Burton must have been aware that whatever he wrote would be read by people all over the world for posterity after his death. Would that have colored some of what he wrote?
Published by Madan G Singh 51 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
“The Highway Rat” is an adventure story for children. Generally children love tales of adventure and this book will not disappoint them. The hero of the story is a greedy rat who is keen to rob food from other animals. Thus the rat grasps food from a simple rabbit, a carefree squirrel as well as a group of ants. Julia goes on to describe how the rat lures an innocent duck and robs the poor bird of its food.
Published by Madan G Singh 51 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 0 comments
Etymology is defined as ˜'History of a word'. A further derivative of this word is Folk Etymology. It means a foreign or unfamiliar word which is adapted to a more familiar form through usage in a language. Folk Etymology in English language is an ongoing process that is prevalent for the last 1000 years
Published by Madan G Singh 52 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 0 comments
Jamaica Kincaid is an American author who was born in Antigua. Her novel Annie John written in 1985 tells the story of a young girl who grows to young womanhood. The novel chronicles the life of Annie John from the age of ten to seventeen, when the girl proceeds to England for a course in nursing.
Published by Madan G Singh 52 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 1 comments
The Merchant of Venice is a play both about love and hate. Shakespeare projects these emotions through the Jewish and Christian characters and the settings for the play, Belmont and Venice. Love and Hate are the backbone of the play and collectively they form the dominant theme.Shakespeare thus proves he is a master of human emotions and their presentation on the stage.
Published by Madan G Singh 54 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
When Pippa made it known that she is planning a book about everything she had learned from her family's party supplies enterprize, Party Pieces, publishers jumped at the opportunity to sign a contract with her. Michael Joseph, a division of Penguin, offered Pippa an advance quite high especially for somebody who isn't an established writer. There was also plans for two more books to follow after the first. Pippa's family connection to the Royals may have been the appeal that got her the...
Published by Inforead 56 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
The Mahabharata brings out the fact that though Draupadi may or may not have been consulted on the Polyandrous marriage, yet she was a woman of substance and exercised her will over all the brothers and they accepted what she said. We must remember that Draupadi despite being married to 5 brothers exercised her will and thus emerges an example of a liberated woman.
Published by Madan G Singh 59 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
The Bheel Mahabharata recounts that Draupadi was a woman of exceptional beauty with golden hair and milk white complexion. The news of her beauty reached Visuka the snake god, who ruled over the Patal or the nether world. Visuka was enamoured of Draupadi and he mounted his horse and set forth towards Hastinpura where the Pandva’s resided, with a one point agenda to possess the beautiful Draupadi.
Published by Madan G Singh 59 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
"Lorna Doone' is a love story that has stood the test of time. Blackmore himself tried to get it published, but the first attempt failed and the novel was published only on a second attempt. The novel is a historical romance in the genre of the novels of Sir Walter Scott who himself rated Blackmore very highly'.The book was published in 1869 and has been in continuous print since then. The novel is a moving love story which has an historical background. The writer makes no pretense for histori...
Published by Madan G Singh 62 months ago in Literature & Classics | +4 votes | 0 comments
Aphrodite, one of the most beautiful, most alluring, most attractive, most controversial and most famous goddesses with a sexy body in mythology, is the Greek goddess of beauty, love and lust. In addition she is also the goddess of pleasure and procreation. She married Hephaestus and the lover of Ares, Dionysus, Poseidon, Hermes, Anchises, Adonis and many others.
Published by Nobert Bermosa 63 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 2 comments
The purpose of this article is to investigate the events that led up to the Salem witch trials, representatives of the government, legal and religious institutions that presided over the trials, and the outcome of the trials. The historical inaccuracies embodied in Arthur Miller’s dramatic presentation the Salem witch trials, entitled The Crucible, will also be examined.
Published by Deborah Livingston 65 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 2 comments
Physiognomy exists to distinguish the masculine and feminine types. Innate human behavior and the character than one gender, or even mixed genders, essentially possess allows one to classify the stronger sex. Ideals such as these influenced the likes of Aristotle, Loxos, Polemo, and many other men, who sought to classify the sexes by their obvious tendencies.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 65 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 4 comments
The Rape of Lucretia was, evidently, a legend in the Roman Republic and it was included in Livy’s notable work the History of Rome. The the violation of chastity is also a violation of the domos of man. The act of rape, in this case, is the interaction between men. A rape of one’s dignity and a violation of family honor. The story of Lucretia is filled with notions of tyranny, often associated with violation and hyper sexuality. There is a lack of control so one must act on it.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 65 months ago in Literature & Classics | +4 votes | 2 comments
Blockade Billy, by Stephen King, is an attempt by King to step away from the horror and supernatural elements that are commonly found in his novels, instead focusing on a mentally ill baseball player. While the book itself is quite well written and entertaining, is this the right move for King?
Published by Seth Morgan 66 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
The playwright Titus Maccius Plautus is one of the earliest comic dramatists in Rome. Many of Plautus’ works remain incomplete, yet what is left is often regarded as soiled and corrupt. Nonetheless, he was a comedic genius in every sense of the Latin world and his work continues to have an enormous impact on Western Civiliation.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 66 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 5 comments
Ovid’s narrative often highlights the thrill of fear; as if it is an attractive quality to have, to inflict fear on the innocent. Ovid wrote a frivolous series of love poems known as the Amores, intended to entertain and shock. Ovid also wrote The Art of Love, which appeared to applaud the loose sexual morals of the Roman upper classes at a time when Augustus was trying to clean up the mores of upper class Rome.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 67 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 4 comments
Grab your towels. May 25th is Towel Day since, It is a day of tribute to Douglas Adams, author the science fiction trilogy The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. The day will be celebrated by fans around the world. It was first celebrated in 2001, just two weeks after Adams sudden and unexpected death. Grab your towels and some friends - just maybe not their towels! - and pay tribute to Adams on May 25.
Published by Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman 67 months ago in Literature & Classics | +6 votes | 0 comments
The Amazons were essentially a prehistoric people who inverted the social order. And so those women, by their unjust greed for others' land, justly lost their own. The earliest coinage in fact has Amazonian influences with bulls and lions, but more importantly, the first head placed on a coin was Mytilene, the founder of Lesbos, showing the myth was alive and well. The myth of the Amazons reminds Greeks of the time from 4-18 B.C. that they would rather forget. Their children’s growth and ...
Published by Lauren Axelrod 68 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 3 comments
Hetaerai were often depicted in art mingling with mixed company and participating as if they belonged there. These women were sometimes granted more freedom intellectually than their more "respectable" counterparts, which is one of the things that made them so unique for their time. The hetaerai were associated with the wealthiest in Greek society, but they had no protection from the people below them. They were still commodities of exchange among the wealthy.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 68 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 2 comments
Which Charles Dickens fictional character do you love the most?Nancy,Bill Sykes' mistress in Oliver Twist is loved by many.She is such a complex character having been thieving since she was a child,but being like a mother to the innocent young orphan Oliver even though she knows she is risking her life to do so.
Published by Amanda Wilkins 68 months ago in Literature & Classics | +3 votes | 2 comments
Even though dragons are mythical creatures, they have fascinated people throughout history. They are often depicted as having reptilian or serpentine characteristics that may have wings and sometimes breath fire. Some are revered in various religions and culture around the world such as those associated with wisdom, longevity and prosperity, while others are treated as personification of evil and death. Let us take a look at 10 mythological dragons found in different mythologies.
Published by Eddie Go 69 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 3 comments
Everyone likes villains, because they make stories interesting, exciting, and fun to read. Without villains, all stories, whether real life situations or fictional tales, would be boring and lifeless. We will take a closer look at ten memorable villains found in some of the greatest myths of the ancient world.
Published by Eddie Go 69 months ago in Literature & Classics | +6 votes | 3 comments
For a country that is predominantly Christian, the Philippines is not famous as a Bible reading nation. Many homes comprise at least a copy of the Holy Bible, but is it being read only on special occasion. A Bible study or prayer gatherings are the most available time the Book is open and read. The Society of Saint Paul Philippines has been trying to rectify this situation and encouraging the widespread reading of the Bible by conducting a yearly National Bible Quiz.
Published by Ron Siojo 71 months ago in Literature & Classics | +20 votes | 17 comments
Becoming enormously popular from the moment it hit the book stores, the perennial tale of ScroogeÂ’s spiritual journey from miserable old miser to the very soul of Christmas sold out the first 6,000 copies by Christmas day, 1843. But as many scholars note, this extraordinary literary work may not have initially been an effort to boost the morale of LondonÂ’s citizenry, but rather a personal catharsis rooted in DickensÂ’ own troubled childhood.
Published by James R. Coffey 73 months ago in Literature & Classics | +9 votes | 7 comments
Eusebius Pamphili's The History of the Church traces the history of the Church from the time of Christ all the way to the end of the Great Persecution and the conversion of the Roman Emperor Constantine.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 75 months ago in Literature & Classics | +13 votes | 4 comments
Writing outlets and becoming successful in the world of writing
Published by Martin Dansky 77 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 2 comments
Mr Bumble the beadle from Oliver Twist is one of Charles Dickens' greatest comic characters.
Published by Alex Crawley 77 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
The Reservist by Boey Kim Cheng, who is a Singaporean poet who migrated to Australia, is a ballad that has the characteristics of a free verse in terms of its form, structure, rhyme scheme, and rhythm.
Published by Conviron Pucate Altatis 78 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 0 comments
An essay i prepared on what English literature is really for. This article mainly focuses on dystopia style texts such as 1984 and Brave New World, as they, in my opinion, are the most meaningful.
Published by Zizheng Cao 78 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 1 comments
Some of Charles Dickens's greatest achievements are his comic and grotesque characters. Here are some of the best.
Published by Alex Crawley 79 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 1 comments
This is an article summarizing all the chapters of the book, Animal Farm.
Published by CWX 79 months ago in Literature & Classics | +8 votes | 5 comments
In A Journal Of The Plague Year, Daniel Defoe examined his contemporary environment of London during the Plague Year of 1665, using a fictional narrator named
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 79 months ago in Literature & Classics | +10 votes | 9 comments
The Red Badge of Courage may be one of the greatest historical novels ever written. This novel by the great Stephen Crane depicts the life of a boy in the American Civil War.
Published by Jacob Carvalho 81 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
Throughout the works of Shakespeare lie detailed clues and personal impressions of the writers' social ideals. Especially in sonnet 18 Shakespeare demonstrates his humanist nature that is evident of the influence of the Renaissance period.
Published by Mitch Page 81 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 1 comments
The book England's Glorious Revolution: 1688-1689, written by Steven Pincus, presents a series of primary historical sources that illustrate practically every angle of the Glorious Revolution, as well as providing an accompanying commentary in the form of an introduction and transitory paragraphs in between documents.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 81 months ago in Literature & Classics | +9 votes | 2 comments
Charles Dickens was the most popular novelist of his day, but many of his fellow writers were critical of his approach.
Published by Alex Crawley 81 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
Brief summary of five recommended novels about art and artists; The Moon and Sixpence, The Agony and the Ecstasy, My Name is Asher Lev, The Lust for Life and Of Human Bondage.
Published by Judith Barton 81 months ago in Literature & Classics | +8 votes | 4 comments
While many can recite the many popular nursery rhymes, few know the dark and secret meanings behind them.
Published by James R. Coffey 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 6 comments
Joseph Cunningham is the first foreign writer to have written an authentic account of the Sikhs. The book is a treasure house of information of that period.
Published by Madan G Singh 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 1 comments
Analysis of W. B. Yeats' great early poem "The Tale of Wandering Aengus", a beatiful and romantic, but mysterious, work.
Published by Alex Crawley 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 0 comments
A scholarly review of the book, The Age of Napoleon, written by Christopher Herold
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 2 comments
Desiderius Erasmus' Praise Of Folly satirically examines the ignorance and stubbornness of the Medieval Age in order to establish and found the true idea of the individual's potential, one of the centerpieces of the humanist movement of the 1500s.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +12 votes | 5 comments
For those who grew up under the wondrous cinematic spell cast by master cartoonist Walt Disney, the world of faery tales and fables appears to be a veritable wonderland created just for kids. Indeed, the happily-ever-after realms of Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, and Cinderella, make it easy to assume that the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, and Hans Christian Anderson were born to create wondrous realms where children could let their imaginations run wild. But what most parents and children a...
Published by James R. Coffey 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +18 votes | 17 comments
The Arabian Nights, also known as The Thousand And One Nights, is a celebrated collectionof tales, longcurrent in the East, and supposed to have been derived by the Arabians from India, through the medium of Persia. They were first introduced into Europe in the beginning of the eighteenth century by means of the translation of Antoine Galland, a distinguished French orientalist, which was hailed with universal delight, and soon became one of the most popular works in Europe.
Published by Inforead 83 months ago in Literature & Classics | +4 votes | 2 comments
A description of the sonnet including a discussion of the Petrarchan and Shakespearean forms.
Published by Leslie Baldwin 84 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
The poem Eloisa and Abelard is a beautiful love poem that has stood the test of time. The poetry of Alexander Pope through the true story of Eloisa and Pierre Abelard.
Published by Jaz 84 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 0 comments
Dame Agatha Christie is a very interesting person.
Published by Lady Samantha 84 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 5 comments
HP Lovecraft's Necronomicon (The Book of Dead Names) is a classic in both fiction and the occult fields. The book itself may not be real, but the very idea of it can make magic risky.
Published by Jymi X/0 230 months ago in Literature & Classics | +0 votes | 0 comments
Profiles of Prominent and Australian writers and poets, and quotes from their famous books. Some authors included are Thomas Keneally, Peter Carey, Miles Franklin, Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Patrick White, Elizabeth Jolley, and Christina Stead.
Published by Tel Asiado 84 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 5 comments
Rabindranath Tagore was the author of some of the greatest works in Literature and he was also the greatest Bengali writer of all time.
Published by Drona Negi 82 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 0 comments
There are some interesting Yorkshire superstitions in Wuthering Heights.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 87 months ago in Literature & Classics | +13 votes | 9 comments
Some people have called Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard a tragedy, but there's a case to be made for it being a comedy.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 87 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 11 comments
Gaston Leroux's "The Phantom of the Opera" demonstrates Gothic ideas about the subconscious, society, and the role of women.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 88 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 4 comments
LerouxÂ’s "The Phantom of the Opera" can certainly be classified as a work of Gothic fiction. The tone and plot alone suggest the genre.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 88 months ago in Literature & Classics | +3 votes | 1 comments
Gaston Leroux's "Phantom of the Opera" dragged its readers beneath the Paris Opera to a world that was both frightening and alluring in its otherness, a characteristic of the Gothic genre.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 88 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 2 comments
A scholarly review of the book, The Coming Of The French Revolution written by George Lefebvre.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 89 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 6 comments
A scholarly review of the book, Origins Of The French Revolution written by William Doyle.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 89 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 3 comments
Oscar Wilde's Selfish Giant is a fantastic short story that has an aesthetic value and narrated in a lucid style.
Published by Rama lingam 90 months ago in Literature & Classics | +10 votes | 3 comments
One of the more extreme feminist views of Rossetti's "Goblin Market" revolves around womenÂ’s perceived place within a sexual economy.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 90 months ago in Literature & Classics | +6 votes | 1 comments
The gruesome deaths of Madeline and Roderick Usher in Edgar Allan Poe's short story “Fall of the House of Usher,” come as the conclusion to the gradual decay of the entire Usher line. What this decay specifically is and what the destruction of the “house” signifies, however, is open to interpretation.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 1 comments
The tale of Frankenstein touches on issues of bioethics, morality, religion and existentialism. Frankenstein was written in three Volumes - here is the summary of Volume Three with links to the others.
Published by Judith Barton 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +6 votes | 7 comments
The tale of Frankenstein touches on issues of bioethics, morality, religion and existentialism. Here is a summary of Volume II of the three volume story of Frankenstein.
Published by Judith Barton 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 2 comments
The tale of Frankenstein touches on issues of bioethics, morality, religion and existentialism. Here is a summary of Volume I with links to the remaining summaries of Vol II and III.
Published by Judith Barton 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +6 votes | 1 comments
The tale of Frankenstein touches on issues of bioethics, morality, religion and existentialism. The characters are summarized here with links to an introduction and plot summaries.
Published by Judith Barton 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +3 votes | 0 comments
The tale of Frankenstein touches on issues of bioethics, morality, religion and existentialism. One dark and gloomy night Mary Shelley is challenged by Lord Byron to write a horror story and she successfully complies.
Published by Judith Barton 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 7 comments
British Literary Modernism developed after Victorianism, which came about after Romanticism. Modernism could be seen as the rebellious child of those past ages past, as it developed itself in large part as a reaction against the ideals that first gave birth to it.
Published by Caitlynn Lowe 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 4 comments
This article is a look at the carnival of the Middle Ages and the purpose it served. Mikhail Bakhtin interprets Francois Rabelais's novel to explain how the grotesque realism of the carnival benefitted the society.
Published by Gayle Haynes 93 months ago in Literature & Classics | +3 votes | 4 comments
The Bottle Imp is a short story by Robert Louis Stevenson. It is a morality tale dealing greed and contentment.
Published by Judith Barton 93 months ago in Literature & Classics | +12 votes | 2 comments
The Marabar caves are among the most potent and compelling locations in modern literature. The caves are the creation of E.M. Forster and form the dark heart of his 1924 novel A Passage to India.
Published by MJ5446 93 months ago in Literature & Classics | +8 votes | 4 comments
A critical analysis of Villa's classic wordless poem.
Published by chololuistro 94 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 1 comments
A brief analysis of some of the copies of Beowulf. The best of accuracy, poetic styling and indepth analysis around.
Published by Carolann K 94 months ago in Literature & Classics | +2 votes | 1 comments
Hilda Conkling had a brief, brilliant career as a poet.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 95 months ago in Literature & Classics | +7 votes | 4 comments
King Lear is reputed to be one of Shakespeare's greatest plays, but also one of his most difficult. Grasping the psychology of the characters of the play is fundamental if one wishes to understand the potential implications of this masterpiece. In this respect, King Lear's ouster from the pompous courts into the tempestuous fields at the end of act two marks a decisive moment in the development of the play.
Published by Kyapa 95 months ago in Literature & Classics | +5 votes | 1 comments
A brief summary of the book Eragon, written by Christopher Paolini. One fateful day, while Eragon is out hunting in a treacherous mountain valley, he stumbles onto a beautiful polished stone. He thinks of selling it to pay for some meat for his family, but when the stone turns out to be a dragon egg, Eragon
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 96 months ago in Literature & Classics | +11 votes | 5 comments
this is one of the oldest classic pieces of literature in the world
Published by carol roach 102 months ago in Literature & Classics | +1 votes | 1 comments
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