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There are a number of reasons why people will always write poetry.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +25 votes | 6 comments
Some kind yet effective ways to critique someone's poem.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 93 months ago in Literature & Classics | +22 votes | 7 comments
For a country that is predominantly Christian, the Philippines is not famous as a Bible reading nation. Many homes comprise at least a copy of the Holy Bible, but is it being read only on special occasion. A Bible study or prayer gatherings are the most available time the Book is open and read. The Society of Saint Paul Philippines has been trying to rectify this situation and encouraging the widespread reading of the Bible by conducting a yearly National Bible Quiz.
Published by Ron Siojo 74 months ago in Literature & Classics | +20 votes | 17 comments
For those who grew up under the wondrous cinematic spell cast by master cartoonist Walt Disney, the world of faery tales and fables appears to be a veritable wonderland created just for kids. Indeed, the happily-ever-after realms of Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, and Cinderella, make it easy to assume that the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, and Hans Christian Anderson were born to create wondrous realms where children could let their imaginations run wild. But what most parents and children a...
Published by James R. Coffey 86 months ago in Literature & Classics | +18 votes | 17 comments
The playwright Titus Maccius Plautus is one of the earliest comic dramatists in Rome. Many of Plautus’ works remain incomplete, yet what is left is often regarded as soiled and corrupt. Nonetheless, he was a comedic genius in every sense of the Latin world and his work continues to have an enormous impact on Western Civiliation.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 69 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 5 comments
Ovid’s narrative often highlights the thrill of fear; as if it is an attractive quality to have, to inflict fear on the innocent. Ovid wrote a frivolous series of love poems known as the Amores, intended to entertain and shock. Ovid also wrote The Art of Love, which appeared to applaud the loose sexual morals of the Roman upper classes at a time when Augustus was trying to clean up the mores of upper class Rome.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 70 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 4 comments
A scholarly review of the book, Origins Of The French Revolution written by William Doyle.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +16 votes | 3 comments
While many can recite the many popular nursery rhymes, few know the dark and secret meanings behind them.
Published by James R. Coffey 85 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 6 comments
A scholarly review of the book, The Age of Napoleon, written by Christopher Herold
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 85 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 2 comments
Profiles of Prominent and Australian writers and poets, and quotes from their famous books. Some authors included are Thomas Keneally, Peter Carey, Miles Franklin, Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Patrick White, Elizabeth Jolley, and Christina Stead.
Published by Tel Asiado 88 months ago in Literature & Classics | +15 votes | 5 comments
The Amazons were essentially a prehistoric people who inverted the social order. And so those women, by their unjust greed for others' land, justly lost their own. The earliest coinage in fact has Amazonian influences with bulls and lions, but more importantly, the first head placed on a coin was Mytilene, the founder of Lesbos, showing the myth was alive and well. The myth of the Amazons reminds Greeks of the time from 4-18 B.C. that they would rather forget. Their children’s growth and ...
Published by Lauren Axelrod 71 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 3 comments
Hetaerai were often depicted in art mingling with mixed company and participating as if they belonged there. These women were sometimes granted more freedom intellectually than their more "respectable" counterparts, which is one of the things that made them so unique for their time. The hetaerai were associated with the wealthiest in Greek society, but they had no protection from the people below them. They were still commodities of exchange among the wealthy.
Published by Lauren Axelrod 71 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 2 comments
Some people have called Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard a tragedy, but there's a case to be made for it being a comedy.
Published by Kathleen Murphy 90 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 11 comments
A scholarly review of the book, The Coming Of The French Revolution written by George Lefebvre.
Published by Gregory Tarleton-Markov 92 months ago in Literature & Classics | +14 votes | 6 comments
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