Great Villains of Myths
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Great Villains of Myths

Everyone likes villains, because they make stories interesting, exciting, and fun to read. Without villains, all stories, whether real life situations or fictional tales, would be boring and lifeless. We will take a closer look at ten memorable villains found in some of the greatest myths of the ancient world.

Ahriman

In Persian mythology or Zoroastrianism, Ahriman, also known as Angra Mainyu, was the personification of evil that introduced all kinds of disasters and ills into the world. He battled against his spirit-twin Spenta Mainya, the personification of good, who assisted Ahura Mazda become the final victor in the cosmic war.

Balor

Also known as the "Evil Eye", Balor was the Irish mythic god of death, who, as had been prophesied, was ultimately slain with a slingshot by his grandson Lugh, the god of light. He was a king of a race of gigantic warriors called Formorians; he had one huge leg and one eye, which was kept shut except during battle because anything he glanced at would instantly die.

Coyolxauhqui

Coyolxauhqui was the moon goddess in Aztec mythology. She, together with her brothers (the stars) was just about to attack their pregnant mother Coatlicue (the earth), her brother Huitzilopochtli (the sun god) suddenly sprang from her mother's womb fully armored. Coyolxauhqui was eventually slain by Huitzilopochtli, who cut off her head and threw it into the sky forming the moon.

Loki

(Loki as depicted on an 18th century Icelandic manuscript) Image source

As the god of mischief in Norse mythology, Loki tricked the blind Hod to create and shoot a magical arrow made of mistletoe, with which to kill the otherwise invincible Balder, the god of innocence and light. This trickster god, known as "the Sly One," can shapeshift into various animal forms, including changing his sex.

Ravana

In the Hindu epic "Ramayana," Ravana was the demon-king of Lanka, who was depicted as having 10 heads and 20 hands. He lusted after Sita and held her in captivity for many years, often threateningly urging her to marry him but was refused every time. He was killed in a violent war by Rama, an avatar of Vishnu, in his effort to rescue his wife Sita.

Mordred

Mordred was the son of King Arthur and a knight of the Round Table, who usurped the throne of England when his father and the rest of the knights pursued Lancelot into France. His rebellion caused the downfall of his father in the Battle of Camlann, where he was ultimately defeated and killed, while his father was mortally injured.

Seth

Image source

Considered to be the embodiment of evil, Seth, the Egyptian god of chaos, was often depicted with a curved snout, sort of like an aardvark, erect-tipped ears, forked tail and a body similar to a greyhound. He murdered his brother Osiris by cutting his body into pieces, which he cast into the Nile to prevent its resurrection.

Lamashtu

The sky god Anu's daughter, Lamashtu was the Sumerian demon goddess, who was often portrayed as having a hairy body, lion's head, donkey's ears, long fingernails and bird's legs with sharp claws. Her modus operandi would include sneaking into a room of a pregnant woman to touch her tummy 7 times killing the baby; or feed the new born baby with her poisonous breast milk.

Mara

A personification of evil according to Buddhist myth, Mara gave visions of lovely women attempting to seduce Siddharta, later Gautama Buddha, who was meditating under the Bo tree in order to hinder his enlightenment. She was regarded as the source of all misfortune, wickedness, annihilation and death.

Polyphemus

(Odysseus in the cave of Polyphemus by Jacob Jordaens, first half of 17th century) Image source

In Homer's "Odyssey," Odysseus and his men feasted on the food they found in a cave which happened to belong to Polyphemus, who proceeded to trap and eat several of them. Polyphemus was a cyclops, who was offered wine by the crafty Odysseus, who then used a sharpened pole to blind his only eye when he became drunk and fell asleep before escaping with his men.

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Comments (4)

Super article!  Everyone does like villains, they're much more fun than good guys.

Thank you Eddie for this interesting myth article. Hope to avail your friendship and support. Always in your support.

Mythology is very interesting.  Enjoyed reading this!

I see Zeus, from the game: Age of Mythology as your article's picture, he can be considered as a villain because of his shenanigans. Coincidently, the villains which came up in my mind appeared in your article. Nice job!

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